41. Low Incidence and Medically and Physically Challenged (MPC)


Forms/Links 

Low Incidence include the following services:

Audiology
Specialized (PHI) Physical Health Impairment
Specialized (D/HH) Deaf and Hard of Hearing services
  • D/HH Interpreter Services
  • D/HH Transcription / Note taking
  • D/HH Speech / Communication Skills

Specialized (VI) Vision Impairment Services

  • VI – Orientation and Mobility
  • VI – Braille Transcription
  • Vision Therapy

Medically and Physically Challenged (MPC) Classroom

41.1            Related Services on the IEP

 In the IEP process, Related Services should not be thought of as an area of need.  Instead, Related Services may support an area of need.  For example, a student does not have “OT needs” but has fine motor needs that affect educational progress and may require the support of an occupational therapist or the educational specialist. 

The discussion of related services is held after student strengths and areas of need are identified, after goals are developed, and after necessary accommodations or modifications are identified.

 

  

41.1.1            Related Services - Present Levels

With the exception of Health, all sections of the Present Levels of Educational Performance may include input from multiple IEP team members; there is no area of the Present Levels that is the sole responsibility of a specific related service provider.  For example, the Speech Pathologist, classroom teacher and Education Specialist may all have input regarding the student’s communication skills in the school environment.  APE, PT and OT specialists may have detailed knowledge about a student’s motor ability, but a student’s teacher or Educational Specialist may also provide input on how a student is navigating the school environment or how the student is using classroom tools.

41.1.2             Related Services - IEP Goals

If the IEP team determines that related services are required for the student to make educational progress, the related service provider must be connected to a goal or goals that support student achievement in the classroom setting.  Any staff/service providers responsible for implementing the goal need to be indicated in the “persons responsible” section of the goals.

41.1.3             Service Delivery Model

One-on-one or small group pullout intervention is not the only “direct” intervention service.  The continuum of servicesranges from the least restrictive service of collaborating with staff to the most restrictive service of removing student from their educational setting to provide service. 

The student’s needs are best met when skill acquisition is connected to meaningful school activities, with classmates, and in natural settings where teachers, support staff, and service providers work together and model effective strategies. 

41.1.4             Special Factors

Below are examples of language that may be used on the Special Factors page 1 of the IEP: 

“List Subject Area” - WHAT is the content area(s) that require support? 

Example:
Written language, reading comprehension, speaking & listening, social interaction, self-help, physical education 

“Service” – WHICH service will be supporting these areas?  (SLP, OT, PT, APE, etc.) 

“Environment” - WHERE will this service be provided the majority of the time? 

  • Services provided within a special education classroom need to be listed as Separate Classroom.
  • In some cases it may be appropriate to list a service twice with 2 different    environments when the content area being supported is different.
  • Example

Speaking & Listening

Speech development

Language & Speech

Separate Classroom

Speaking & Listening

Language development

Language & Speech

General Education

 “Comments” – HOW will the service be provided? 

Do NOT include specific hours or minutes per week since students benefit from some flexibility in how services are to be provided.  It may be appropriate to indicate how frequently a service will be implemented (twice weekly, weekly, every other week) 

Example:
Services will typically be provided on an every other week basis for up to 8 hours per year.   (This allows for some student absences, special activities, statewide testing, etc).
 
Indicate how a specific area of need could be addressed through directinteraction with the provider.
Examples: 
Skill building with [service provider] present will focus on... 
Co-teach with teaching staff. 
Small group instruction.
 
For collaboration services, indicate who the service provider will collaborate with and for what purpose. 
Examples: 
The PT will collaborate with APE, MT, SLP and teacher to increase movement opportunities in all settings. 

The SLP will collaborate with teaching staff to develop and implement classroom language lessons. 

For consultation services indicate who is the intended focus of the consultation and for what skill or area of need.  Consultation is with another adult, and the child may not be present. 
Example: 
The [service provider] will consult with “whom” for “what”... 
 
 If the parent remains concerned about knowing the "weekly minutes," it is appropriate to write in Special Factors Page 2, section C:
 Example: 
 Service time for PT is approximately XX minutes every other week. Amount of time per session may depend on the intervention focus at that time.

  

  • All Related Services Providers document IEP services provided to students in MediCal billing program.   Parents, Principals and other school officials may request MediCal billing program documentation to verify services provided.  Parents wanting access to this information should make their request directly to the case manager. 

 41.1.5           Implementing and Monitroing Related Services

 For students with the Federal Handicapping Condition of “Speech Language Impairment” who do not require Specialized Academic Instruction, the Speech Language Pathologist will be  the service    provider and the case manager (“speech only”).  SLP will be the primary service.

 

In the majority of situations, the case manager is the teacher providing specialized academic instruction.  Case manager responsibilities with respect to related services include: 

  • Ensure that each general education teacher and related service providers have been given information regarding his or her specific responsibilities in implementing the student’s IEP.  This includes the specific accommodations, modifications and supports that must be provided to the student in accordance with the IEP.
  • Ensure that related services are available and scheduled.
  • Completion of the Service Provider Log.  Refer to Forms/Links. 
Progress Reports: 
Related service providers are required to provide progress reports to parents as indicated on each student’s IEP.  Progress reports must be entered into the district’s electronic IEP system.  A copy of the progress report must be given to the parent/guardian and must be included in the student’s special education container within the cum file. 
 
 

41.2            Audiology

Forms/Links

Definition

The San Diego Unified School District’s Audiology Program is designed to provide audiological assessment, direct consultative services to students with a hearing impairment or with an auditory processing disorder; and to support parents, staff and other related district offices in their efforts to provide students equal access to district curriculum and programs.

 Services provided include: 
  • Audiological evaluations for students with known or suspected hearing loss;
  • Auditory processing disorder (C-APD) assessments for students with known or suspected auditory processing difficulties as part of a multidisciplinary team assessment;
  • Hearing screenings for preschool and school age students in a special education program or being referred for special education services, and for difficult to test students in regular education;
  • Make recommendations regarding the use of and proper fit of hearing aids, cochlear implants, Assistive Listening Devices, as well as for individual FM systems, group FM systems and sound field FM or Infrared systems;
  • Conduct an analysis of classroom noise through acoustical testing to make recommendations for acoustic modifications as it relates to a student with a hearing loss or auditory processing disorder; and
  • Program digital hearing aids and personal FM systems. 

41.2.1             When to Refer a Student

There are three types of referrals:

 1.   For an Audiologic Evaluation/Hearing Screening (in a Sound Conditioned Booth)

Students in general education, grades K through 12 and Special Education students from the Infant Program through age 22 are assessed if the following conditions are evident:

  • The student has a known or suspected hearing loss.
  • The student has failed two hearing screenings performed at the school site.
  • The student needs verification of normal hearing post middle ear surgery.
  • The student has been referred for Special Education Services.
  • Difficult to test students requiring specialized testing.

2.  For a Central Auditory Processing Disorder Assessment

Students in general education, grades K through 12 being referred for Special Education Services and students in grades K through 12 already receiving Special Education services are not assessed if the following conditions are evident:

  • The student already has an identified auditory processing disorder;
  • The student has an intellectual disability (cognitive impairment);
  • The student has a hearing impairment;
  • The student has significant articulation deficits;
  • The student has significant behavior problems;
  • The student is not proficient in English; or
  • The student is 6 years old or younger. 

The following requisite skills are necessary for a Central Auditory Processing (CAPD) assessment:

  • Student is able to wear auditory headphones or inserts for extended periods of time;
  • Student is able to sit in a sound booth without assistance for extended periods of time; and
  • Student is able to respond to test stimuli and/or repeat words without prompting.
  • For more information, please refer to the CAPD Position Paper found in Forms/Links.

3.  For Fitting an Assistive Listening Device

Students with an IEP who have an auditory processing disorder or suspected auditory processing disorder and are unable to be tested can be referred for a trial with an assistive listening device.  The case manager should complete the form "Request for trial with an assistive listening device"  found in Forms/Links and send it to the Audiology Assessment Center.

41.2.2             Referral Process

 

For an Audiologic Evaluation/Hearing Screening (in a Sound Conditioned Booth)
  •  An “Application For Audiologic Evaluation” form should be filled out by the referral source, signed by parent and sent to the Audiology Assessment Center.  See Forms/Links.
For a (Central) Auditory Processing Disorder Assessment CAPD
 
CAPD evaluations are only performed on students who meet the following criteria: 
  • Are already receiving Special Ed services and a Central Auditory Processing Disorder is suspected.
  • As part of an initial assessment for Special Ed services.
  • Hearing within normal limits.
  • At least 7 years of age.
  • Ability to follow multi-step commands
  • No significant articulation errors.
  • Ability to tolerate headphones for an extended period of time.
  • No significant behavioral and/or cognitive problems (IQ 85+)
  • Ability to sit in a sound booth without assistance
  • Fluent English speaker
  • Ability to respond to test stimuli and/or repeat words back. 

If referral is deemed appropriate, please complete the following steps:  1. The case manager completes the Audiology portion of the Assessment Plan as follows:  Find the Additional Assessments section on page three of the Assessment Plan.  Under “Administered by”, select Audiologist”.  Under “Purpose”, select “Auditory Processing.  Under “Please explain”, write “Selected tests of auditory processing to be administered by an audiologist”.  Complete the Request for Central Auditory Process Evaluation form.  Follow the directions on the referral form. See Forms/Links. 

For Fitting an Amplification System

  •  Case manager for the student with an IEP for Hearing Impairment or Auditory Processing Disorder makes a request to the Audiologist assigned to the student. 

Contact Information:

(619) 497-3520

Location:

Audiology Assessment Center
Education Center, Annex 17
 

41.3            Physically Handicapped (PH/Related) - Itinerant

Forms/Links

Definition

Students with a significant physical or other health impairment enrolled in general education, resource programs, or non PH separate classes may require physical modifications to their educational programs.  These modifications may also include assistive technology and physical assistance.  These services may be provided by PH/RELATED itinerant teachers who facilitate the students’ academic access.

 41.3.1             When to Refer a Student

Students qualify for services when they have a diagnosed medical condition that impedes their ability to perform educationally or requires modifications and specialized training.  Such diagnoses include (not an inclusive list): cerebral palsy, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, cystic fibrosis, sickle cell anemia, diabetes, cancer, severe asthma, and traumatic brain injury.  If a child has a handicapping condition of Orthopedic Impairment, PH/itinerant services must be on the IEP if the child’s assigned teacher does not have the required PH/PHI credential for supporting students with Orthopedic Impairments.

41.3.2             Referral Process

Contact the PH department for the specific team that is assigned to the student’s school. 

PH/RELATED  (Transporter)

Definition

This service includes assistance given to a student with an orthopedic impairment (motor limitation) as they travel around the school.  A transporter may push a student in a wheelchair to different locations on school campus (to and from classes, to cafeteria, etc.).

41.3.3            When to Refer a Student

The need for this service would be assessed as part of the support services that a student with a significant orthopedic impairment might require through support services offered by the PH/RELATED itinerant program.

41.3.4            Referral Process

Contact the Low Incidence Department – PH/RELATED program office for the specific team that is assigned to the student’s school. 

Contact Information: 

Mark Creitz 
858-490-8410

Location:

Marston Satellite B-3
4435 Ute Dr.
San Diego, CA  92117
 

41.4            Deaf and Hard of Hearing (D/HH) Services

Forms/Links

Definition

Specialized Deaf and Hard of Hearing (D/HH) Services provide educational and related services to support students aged 0 – 22 who have been identified by a district audiologist as having educational significant hearing impairments to gain equal access to related district curriculum and programs.  D/HH-related disabilities defined in the California Education Code are:

  • Hard of Hearing:  The student has an impairment in hearing, whether permanent of fluctuating, that adversely affects his/her educational performance but that is not included under the definition of deafness.
  • Deafness:  The student has a hearing impairment that is so severe that the student is impaired in processing linguistic information through hearing, with or without amplification, such that it adversely affects his/her educational performance.
  • Deaf-Blindness:  The student has concomitant hearing and visual impairments, the combination of which causes such severe communication and other developmental and educational problems that s/he cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for students with deafness or students with blindness.  If a student has only two disabilities and those disabilities are deafness and blindness, the student must be classified as having deaf-blindness.

41.4.1            When to Refer a Student

A student without an IEP should be referred to a SDUSD Educational Audiologist when s/he is suspected as having a hearing loss that may be interfering with academic achievement or speech and language development. Students in general education grades K through 12, and special education students from the ECSE Infant Program through age 22 are assessed in a Sound Conditioned Booth by a Licensed Educational Audiologist if the following conditions are evident:

  • The student has a known or suspected hearing loss;
  • The student has failed two hearing screenings performed at the school site;
  • Difficult to test students requiring specialized testing different than the hearing screenings performed at the school site;
  • The student has been referred for special education services.

The D/HH Low Incidence Program office should be contacted when a student transfers from another district with an IEP for a D/HH-related disability or services for determination of appropriate placement for services.

41.4.2              Referral Process

If a student does not have an IFSP or IEP, the student’s most current audiogram (hearing test) should be sent to a district audiologist for review.  If there is no audiogram, an Application For Audiologic Evaluation form (refer to Forms/Links) should be filled out by the referral source, signed by the parent and faxed to (619-497-3521) or mailed to the Audiology Assessment Center in Annex 17 at the Education Center.  Upon determination by a district audiologist that a student’s hearing loss is educationally significant, a referral and educational assessment conducted and interpreted by qualified D/HH personnel will be completed along with the development of an Individualized Education Program (IEP), as appropriate. If there are additional areas of suspected disability, the case manager should include qualified D/HH personnel in the referral/assessment process and on the IEP team.

 Only the district’s Licensed Educational Audiologist can add Hard of Hearing (HOH) or Deafness (DEAF) as a disability on an IEP.

 

 

The D/HH Low Incidence Program office should be contacted when a student transfers from another district with an IEP with only DHH-related disability or services for determination of appropriate placement for services.  If there are additional areas of disability, the case manager should include qualified D/HH personnel in the interim placement/assessment process and on the IEP team.

41.4.3            D/HH Services 

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program provides a variety of services and a continuum of service levels designed to meet the unique needs of students who meet the eligibility requirements for a Federal Handicapping Condition defined in IDEA and as outlined in the California Education Code.

Early Intervention Services (Infant Special Education 0 – 3 yrs) may consist of services provided by a credentialed D/HH teacher through home-based and/or in a school-based, separate class setting.  The determination of the need for services is determined by the district audiologist in collaboration with qualified district D/HH personnel and the SDCOE Regional Center. 

Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) Services (3 – 5 yrs) are provided by a credentialed D/HH teacher at a student’s general education/private preschool or in a public school-based, separate class setting.  Eligibility for services is determined by the district audiologist in collaboration with qualified district D/HH personnel.  The least restrictive environment for the provision of services is determined by the IEP Team. 

Specialized Academic Instruction is a service provided by a credentialed D/HH teacher for K – 12 students whose needs require them to be served in a separate class setting for more than 50% of the day.  Eligibility for services is determined by the district audiologist in collaboration with qualified district D/HH personnel.  The least restrictive environment for the provision of services is determined by the IEP Team. 

Specialized Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services are provided by a credentialed D/HH teacher for K – 12 students for whom D/HH is their primary disability and whose needs require them to be served in a separate class setting for less than 50% of the day or for students whose primary disability is NOT D/HH and we are added as a related service. Eligibility for services is determined by the district audiologist in collaboration with qualified district D/HH personnel.  The least restrictive environment for the provision of services is determined by the IEP Team. 

D/HH Note Taking Services are student note takers, enrolled in the same class as a D/HH student, who are hired to take classroom notes.  Honorariums are paid to each student note taker at the end of each full semester of service.  A D/HH student should be referred when s/he is having difficulty accessing auditory information in the classroom.  The student’s D/HHTeacher should be contacted regarding the request.  The D/HH Teacher will coordinate with the general education classroom teacher to select a student note taker and complete the necessary paperwork.  The student must be enrolled in the same classroom as the D/HH student, be able to take legible notes and have a grade of ‘B’ or better for the class. 

Office of Interpreting/Transcription Services (D/HH) is a related district-wide office that provides American Sign Language (ASL), tactile interpreting and transcription services to eligible deaf and hard of hearing students, staff, and parents for district-sponsored activities.

  •  ASL is a visual language that is completely separate and distinct from English.  It has its own semantic and syntactic structure (i.e. rules for morphology, word order, complex grammar) including facial expression and body movements.  Best practice is to have the voice off when communicating with ASL.

 

  • Tactile interpreting is a spectrum of communication strategies designed to accommodate differing degrees of vision loss and hearing loss for eligible deaf and hard of hearing students and parents who also have a vision impairment.
  • Transcription services is real-time meaning-for-meaning access to classroom instruction that a student can view on a laptop computer screen or through the i21 Promethean board during instruction.  Edited notes, including study related materials, are provided after class.

A request for services for staff and parents can be made by email to dhhhands@sandi.net  

Determination of the need of a student (who has a documented, educationally significant hearing loss) for interpreting and/or transcription services is made by the IEP team which   includes  qualified district D/HH personnel.

 

  • Other Specialized Services for Low Incidence Disability are services, by a D/HH Speech Teacher or Speech-Language Pathologist with specialized D/HH training, that provide an individualized program for deaf and hard of hearing students with special emphasis on communication skills, including:  speech development and production, speechreading, auditory training, alternative communication, and language development.  D/HH Communication Services are committed to selecting and using the best elements of ALL communication systems to fully meet the educational, English literacy, social, career/vocational, and post-secondary needs of all students from diverse linguistic, educational and cultural backgrounds.

 

  • D/HH Vocational Counseling Services are provided for D/HH students between the ages of 14 and 22 for whom employability counseling services are deemed appropriate by the IEP team which includes qualified D/HH personnel. Programs and services may include:  interest inventory consultation, vocational counseling, on-campus experience, work training programs, employment opportunities, assistance with mobility training and transportation information, individualized transition program consultations, linkages with community agencies, and special education vocationally-oriented curriculum instruction.   For those students in the district’s TRACE program (students ages 18-22), additional support is provided by a D/HH Itinerant teacher through collaboration with school staff and community resources/agencies to assist students in transitioning from public school to adult life.

Contact Information:

 

 
 
Deaf/Hard of Hearing Department
(858) 490-8451
 
Jeanne Cicchetto (DHH Resource Teacher)
 
Diane Levy (Bilateral Referrals – K-TRACE)
 
Miriam Ornelas (Bilateral Referrals – ECSE)
 
Donna Royce (Audiologist – Bilateral Referrals/ Unilateral Consults)

 

Location: 

Marston Satellite, Rm. B-3 
4435 Ute Dr. 
San Diego, CA 92117 
 

41.5  Visual Impairment

Forms/Links

This section will address Braille Transcription, Itinerant Services, Orientation and Mobility, and Reader services.

Braille Transcription

Definition 

Braille transcription is a method of providing visual print material in a tactile media format that is accessible to blind students.  Braille utilizes raised dots to represent print letters, as well as whole and part-word contractions of printed material.

There are many specific Braille codes used to make print accessible to the blind, these include:

  • Literary Braille Transcription
  • Braille Formats Code: Principles of Print to Braille Transcription
  • The Nemeth Braille Code for Mathematics and Science Notation
  • Braille Code Chemical Notation
  • Computer Braille Code
  • Foreign Language Braille Code

Tactile graphic representations of illustrations, symbols, and graphs are also a critical component of making printed material comprehensible to the blind.

41.5.1            When to Refer a Student

A student should be referred for this service when:

  • A student has already been identified as functionally blind and is being served by the VI program.
  • There is a need for Braille materials and tactile graphic representations.

 41.5.2            Referral Process 

 Procedure for referral handled by VI program:

  • Student must have already been identified as a functionally blind VI student.
  • The VI teacher conducts an informal assessment of the appropriate reading and writing media.
  • The referral for this support is initiated by the VI program once a student begins learning Braille and the need for worksheets, textbooks, or other school printed material in Braille is necessary for the student to have equal access with his/her sighted peers.
  • Service initiated and provided via the IEP team process as an addendum to the current IEP.

Contact:

Braille/Transcription Department
858-490-8414 

Itinerant Services 

Definition 

To be eligible for services, "a student has a visual impairment which, even with correction, adversely affects a pupil's educational performance."  Visually impaired students are classified as functionally blind or having low vision. 

  • Functionally blind students will have needs related to their using their other senses as primary channels for learning. Reading and writing in Braille are particularly important.
  • Low vision students will have needs related   to using their residual vision as a primary channel for learning.  Use of low vision aids, audiobooks, and large print are important accommodations for these students. 

A student who has visual perceptual or visual motor dysfunction resulting solely from a learning related disability does not meet the eligibility criteria for "visual impairment" or "low  incidence related disability" and is therefore not eligible for vision services or low incidence funding.  

 

Vision Therapy is not a service that is provided by the VI program.  Contact the Vision Therapy department if that service is requested.

 

 

41.5.3            When to Refer a Student

A student should be referred when: 

  • A medical diagnosis indicates a degenerative visual syndrome, a reduced visual acuity or field of vision.
  • Visual acuity cannot be improved with the use of corrective lenses.
  • School nurse identifies a reduced visual acuity during vision screening.
  • Parent or school staff are concerned that a student may be visually impaired based on observations of manifested visual behaviors -- frequent rubbing of the eyes, squinting, bumping into things, student complaints of not being able to see, and so on.

41.5.4            Referral Process 

  • Request that the parent/guardian have an ophthalmologist, optometrist, or medical doctor complete the Eye Report for Children with Visual Problems when vision loss is suspected.
  • Contact the VI program office.  The Teacher, parent, medical professional, or school staff may make this contact.  Fax the completed eye report form at the time the program is notified of a student with a suspected visual loss.
  • Once the VI program has been contacted an itinerant teacher for students with visual impairments will be assigned to manage the referral.  Typically, a functional vision assessment will be administered by the VI teacher.
  • Depending on the degree of visual impairment, an orientation and mobility specialist may also be involved to conduct an assessment of the student's travel skills.

Orientation and Mobility 

Definition 

A visual impairment may adversely affect a student's opportunities for unrestricted, independent exploration, movement, and play; understanding of the physical environment and space; ability to become oriented to and to travel in various school and community environments; and acquire basic daily living and social skills.

Orientation and mobility specialists teach: 

  • Environmental and spatial concept development, body image, control, and purposeful movement.
  • Orientation techniques.
  • Self-protection skills.
  • Adaptive visual or nonvisual mobility techniques.
  • Use of residual vision for travel or orientation.
  • Daily living skills related to community travel and independence

41.5.5            When to refer a Student

A student should be referred when:

  • A student has already been identified as visually impaired and is being served by the VI program.
  • Parent and/or school staff is concerned that a student may be having difficulty safely traveling on the campus or off-site.  This may be evidenced by the student bumping into things or becoming related disoriented when traveling from one location to another. 

41.5.6            Referral Process 

  • Student must have already been identified as a VI student, if not, follow the referral process for the Program for Students with Visual Impairments.
  • Contact the VI program office.  The Teacher, parent, medical professional, or school staff may make this contact.
  • State the observed areas of concern as they relate to travel skills.
  • Once the VI program has been contacted, an itinerant orientation and mobility specialist will be assigned to manage the referral.
  • Depending on the degree of deficit relating to travel skills, a functional orientation and mobility assessment may be administered by the orientation and mobility specialist. 

Reader 

Definition 

Visually impaired or functionally blind student requires VI reader or notetaker to fully participate in the core curriculum.  Reader may read printed material to student or take board notes during class, if necessary. 

41.5.7            When to Refer a Student

A student should be referred for this service when: 

  • A student has already been identified as low vision or functionally blind and is being served by the VI program.
  • There is a need for printed material to be read or board notes to be taken in class. 

41.5.8            Referral Process

Procedure for referral handled by VI program: 

  • Student must have already been identified as a low vision or functionally blind VI student.
  • The need for this support is addressed to the VI itinerant teacher, VI program office, or VI Resource Teacher by school staff, student, or parent.
  • Service initiated and provided via the IEP team process as an addendum to the current IEP. 

Contact Information: 

Karen Bowman, Lead Teacher
(858)-490-8451 (phone)

Location: 

Marston Satellite B-4 
4435 Ute Drive 
San Diego, CA  92117 
 

41.6            Medically and Physically Challenged (MPC) Classroom

Forms/Links

Definition 

The San Diego Unified School District’s program for students with medical and physical challenges provides an individualized, highly structured, multi-sensory environment with specialized equipment that is responsive to auditory, visual, olfactory, tactile, vestibular and proprioceptive sensory inputs. Individualized student programs are developed that include a variety of related services and supports and are based on individual needs as outlined in the student’s IEP. 

Located on comprehensive school sites within the district, the Medically and Physically Challenged (MPC) Classroom utilizes a multi-sensory approach to curriculum based on alternative standards and leads to a Certificate of Completion as an alternative to a diploma. The MPC Classroom gives students the tools to actively participate in their educational experience, on the premise that each student, regardless of disability, is assured equal access to the educational options and supports provided to all students of the same age group. This program is based on the principles and beliefs that all students can learn, all students benefit from learning with their peers and that a stimulating environment inspires students to learn through their own actions. 

Eligibility 

In order to be eligible, students must have significant below-average general intellectual functioning (generally 0-24 month range of intellectual development) existing concurrently with deficits in adaptive behavior that adversely affects educational performance. Student should qualify to participate in CAPA Level I.  A student’s medical needs must be chronic in nature and must be documented in the student’s IEP. A student’s IEP must necessitate a need for Specialized Physical Health Care Services (SPHCS), Health Nursing Services (HNS) and/or they must have a medical condition that requires an immediate medical response, resulting in a need for a full time onsite nurse, Special Education Health Technician, and/or specially trained Special Education Technicians and instructional staff. Students typically require supportive equipment for sitting, standing, mobility, or transfers to access their educational environment and significant curricular modifications to access curriculum. 

Determination 

Placement in a MPC classroom is considered a more restrictive setting and does not ensure placement at student’s neighborhood school or schools within the student’s community. The IEP Team must complete the “Request for Consultation to Consider Eligibility for Medically Physically Challenged Classroom” and submit via email to the district’s multi-disciplinary consultation review team. (refer to Forms/Links) After consulting with the district’s multi-disciplinary MPC consultation review team, if the MPC classroom is determined to be an appropriate consideration, an IEP meeting must be convened. At this time, the team must discuss the supports and services the student requires and determine placement. Specialized Academic Instruction (SAI) provided within the MPC classroom is considered more restrictive, therefore eligibility is made on an individualized basis. 

Contact: 

(858) 490-8451 (phone) 

(858) 490-8458 (fax) 

Location: 

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