School History

History of Morse High School

In 1962, a school opened in Southeast San Diego. This was Morse High School. Though times have changed, it is truly fascinating to look at how different things were then.

The President of the United States was John F. Kennedy. People flocked to the theaters to watch what would be Marilyn Monroe's last performance, Some Like It Hot, or stayed home to watch The Jetsons and Route 66. The girls wore their "in" beehives and the guys had crew cuts. And they all listened to the Shangri-las on their AM radios. This was also the year that Morse first opened its doors to 1,200 freshmen, sophomores and juniors.

There was only about a third of today's enrollment that first year. The landscape was pretty much uncluttered. There really wasn't much of anything - trees, plants, or even litter. Everything was clean and the buildings were new. The neighborhood was only recently established, and it would take years for the vacant lots to be developed.

The principal of the school was Thomas E. Walt. Joining him, the faculty, and the students for the school's dedication in 1962 was Leila Morse, the granddaughter of Samuel F.B. Morse.

Morse, now a forty eight year old high school known for its athletic and technology program, is located on a beautiful 65 acre site in Southeast San Diego. The distinguished murals that adorn the buildings not only express the diversity of the student body but also their pride. This pride is evident in their academic programs as well. Its advanced computer programs, math and science curriculum and the aeronautics courses makes Morse one of a kind.

Morse's present enrollment is over 2000 students. Ethnic enrollments include all racial backgrounds. Morse graduates have attended many colleges and universities throughout the United States including Stanford, MIT, Yale, UCLA, UC Berkeley, Hampton University, Columbia University, UCSD, USC, Cal Tech, and UC Santa Barbara to name a few.