AP

Advanced Placement

Roxann Hatfield
AP Coordinator

What is Advanced Placement?

The Advanced Placement (AP) is a program sponsored by the College Board which offers standardized courses to high school students that are generally recognized to be equivalent to undergraduate courses in college. Participating colleges grant credit to students who obtained high enough scores on the exams to qualify.
 
AP provides motivated and academically prepared students with the opportunity to earn college credit or placement and helps them stand out in the college admissions process. Taught by dedicated, passionate AP teachers who bring expert teaching skills to the classroom, AP courses help students develop the study skills, habits of mind, and critical thinking skills that they will need in college.

AP is accepted by more than 3,600 colleges and universities worldwide for college credit, advanced placement, or both on the basis of successful AP Exam grades. This includes over 90 percent of four-year institutions in the United States.  Click on the link below to see a college's AP credit policy.
 

Equitable Access

The College Board strongly encourages educators to make equitable access a guiding principle for their AP programs by giving all willing and academically prepared students the opportunity to participate in AP. We encourage educators to:
  • Eliminate barriers that restrict access to AP for students from ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups that have been traditionally under-served.
  • Make every effort to ensure their AP classes reflect the diversity of their student population.
  • Provide all students with access to academically challenging coursework before they enroll in AP classes
Only through a commitment to equitable preparation and access can true equity and excellence be achieved.